Movies Directed by Richard Linklater (in alphabetical order)

Before Midnight

Before Midnight

When Before Sunrise came out way back in 1995, I skipped it. Even though I was part of the film's so-called target demographic, it just didn't seem like my cup of tea. Two young actors saying clever things to each other for a whole movie? I gave it a pass. In 2004, I gave Before Sunset a pass as well… read more!

Boyhood

Boyhood

Boyhood, as you may have heard, is a special film because it was shot over the course of a 12-year period with the same cast and much of the same crew. It's gimmicky, sure, but it's also a testament to writer/director Richard Linklater's commitment and ambition (as well as that of his collaborators). And it just so happens that his… read more!

Everybody Wants Some

Everybody Wants Some

This has been hailed as a "spiritual sequel" to writer/director Richard Linklater's 1993 ensemble comedy Dazed and Confused, since Dazed concerns Texas high school students in 1976 and Everybody Wants Some concerns Texas college students in 1980. All right, fine, I'll buy that. But Everybody Wants Some – its title taken from a Van Halen song, just as Dazed took its title from a Led Zeppelin song… read more!

A Scanner Darkly

A Scanner Darkly

There's a lot of reasons why I should've hated A Scanner Darkly: I don't normally like the cast, I find Richard Linklater a hit-and-miss director, and I definitely disliked Waking Life, his first foray into "digital rotoscoping", in which live actors are filmed and then painted over with a computer – a technique used again here. Hell, I'm not even that big a… read more!

School of Rock

School of Rock

Every once in a while, I can appreciate a formulaic Hollywood story, if it offers up enough charm to make the predictability palatable. School of Rock is such a movie - almost. I like Jack Black, but here he just plies his usual shtick: though his character's name is Dewey Finn, it might as well be Jack Black. Dewey is… read more!

Waking Life

Waking Life

This film's been getting a lot of praise for its interesting use of animation - taking the age-old technique of rotoscoping (in which live action film is traced over, frame by frame, to create animation that is either cheating or a new art form; Ralph Bakshi made much use of this in the 1970s) and using computers to both update… read more!