Y Tu Mamá También

Y Tu Mamá También

I feel like I should have more to say about this film than I do. But my reaction to it is as simple as its story, about two oversexed teenage boys who decide to take a road trip to a nonexistent beach, and invite a sexy older woman, who is unhappily married to one of the boys' cousins, to come along for the ride: I liked it. Didn't love it. I wish more films could be as good, but if more films were as good, this would be a very average film. (Does that make sense? To me it does.)

The film has a lot going for it: fresh, realistic, and very brave performances by the three leads; rich cinematography that evokes the grit and dusty beauty of the Mexican rural landscape; some steamy sex scenes (which made it the number-one hit in Mexican box office history); and even a bit of introspection: as we follow our three freewheelin' heroes across the back roads of sun-baked Mexico, we are treated to a God-like (or, more frankly, Godard-like) sonorous voiceover that places the characters' rather insignificant adventures in the context of their unspoken thoughts, social issues happening around them, and recent (as well as future!) Mexican history.

Some people might go for this distancing device, some won't. I appreciated it, as by itself, the story is predictable (you know there's going to be sexual tension between all three of the characters, and when it's finally brought out in the open, there are no real surprises), and it's good to see a Mexican film that addresses the often-unspoken class issues that permeate Mexican culture. Y Tu Mamá comes close to making such serious statements - there's a terrific aside that says everything about the two boys' different and ultimately incompatible social backgrounds by revealing how they flush the toilets in each other's houses - but I wasn't as blown away as much as just modestly impressed. Go see it, though. You might even love it - I know many who do.