Movie Titles: L

La La Land

La La Land

From its opening number through much of the film, I have to say that I liked La La Land very much, but I could not love it. Writer/director Damien Chazelle caused such a stir with his incendiary first feature Whiplash that, when I heard he was following it up with an old-fashioned musical about Los Angeles, I couldn't wait. And who can resist the pairing… read more!

La Moustache

La Moustache

I've been bad about seeing foreign films lately. Seems like almost everything I've been seeing this year has been American-made. Of this I am much ashamed, as often the best films I see each year come from other countries. But the truth is, those that are released in the US have such misleading marketing strategies nowadays that I am rarely… read more!

La Petite Lili

La Petite Lili

In 1998, Yelena Danova (who starred in my first film Foreign Correspondents) and another Russian actress named Olga Vodin hired me to write a script for them. The assignment: to adapt Anton Chekhov's The Seagull for the screen, updating the setting from a summer idyll in Czarist Russia to the Malibu of today. It was enjoyable but challenging work, requiring dozens… read more!

The Ladies Man

The Ladies Man

Another Saturday Night Live skit has been adapted for the big screen. If that sentence makes you suspect that The Ladies Man is uninspired and stupid, then you're right on the money. Lesser SNL alumnus Tim Meadows plays lisping, oversexed, '70s-clad radio talk show host Leon Phelps. He's received a letter from a wealthy woman fan and tries to find… read more!

Lara Croft: Tomb Raider

Lara Croft: Tomb Raider

From the get-go, it's clear that this film was really made by a studio marketing department, not by people who wanted to make a great movie. Take a high concept (a female Indiana Jones), throw a hot star at it (Angelina Jolie), make sure it's a safe sell (the video game it's based on is a big hit), and advertise… read more!

Last Days

Last Days

Gus Van Sant's fictionalized account of Kurt Cobain's final hours is the third in his series of achingly slow youth-oriented tragedies, following Gerry and Elephant. As in those previous films, Van Sant once again eschews story in favor of atmosphere. But Last Days lacks the beauty and sadness that made Gerry and especially Elephant so effective. Which is ironic, since… read more!

Last Life in the Universe

Last Life in the Universe

Kenji (Japanese superstar Tadanobu Asano), a neat freak from Osaka, has relocated to Bangkok, where he works in a Japanese-language library. One night, while once again contemplating suicide from a bridge, Kenji meets a local girl named Noi (Sinitta Boonyasak) - after her sister Nid gets killed crossing traffic to save his life. Shortly after this already horrific happenstance, Kenji's… read more!

Last Orders

Last Orders

A dream cast of England's finest (Michael Caine, Bob Hoskins, Helen Mirren, Tom Courtenay, David Hemmings, and Ray Winstone) is assembled for this very British merchant-class drama about a tight-knit group of old farts who gather together after one of their own (Caine) dies, and embark on a road trip to deliver his ashes to the seaside town of Margate.… read more!

Laurel Canyon

Laurel Canyon

One great thing about living in Los Angeles is being able to watch a movie called Laurel Canyon and then, walking out of the theatre, realize that you are just across the street from Laurel Canyon Blvd. Anyway, writer/director Cholodenko made a name for herself with the acclaimed indie High Art back in 1998. This, her second feature, could be… read more!

The Lego Movie

The Lego Movie

I'm not sure whether to describe this film as "The Matrix by way of Toy Story" or as "Toy Story by way of The Matrix". Either comparison is apt. The Lego Movie opens on a "minifig" named Emmet (voiced by Chris Pratt), a friendly dimwit who, like everybody else in his happy little Lego-burg, follows the rules, does what he's… read more!

Les Misérables

Les Misérables

Previously, my only exposure to Victor Hugo's 19th century novel Les Misérables was Claude Lelouch's terrific 1995 film adaptation, which was in French and had no singing and updated the drama to the era between World Wars I and II. Lelouch took many other liberties with Hugo's story, as it turns out, so going in to see Tom Hooper's Les… read more!

Let the Right One In

Let the Right One In

Completely original horror-drama, set in a snowbound Stockholm suburb in early 1982, about a shy 12-year-old boy who is mercilessly bullied at school until he strikes up an odd friendship with the new girl next door... who happens to be a vampire. Sure to attain cult status, especially among goth teens, Let the Right One In is a canny blend… read more!

Letters from Iwo Jima

Letters from Iwo Jima

So here's the story, as I know it: Originally, Letters from Iwo Jima - Eastwood's follow-up to Flags of Our Fathers and the second of his two films dealing with World War II's critical Battle of Iwo Jima - was meant to be released in the spring of 2007. I suspect the hope was that Flags of Our Fathers, released… read more!

Levity

Levity

As average as a movie can get. I saw Levity when it opened the 2003 Sundance Film Festival, and there was something so appropriate about that, as it has all the elements of a stereotypical Sundance film: death, loss, drug addiction, crime, religion, gritty urban decay. And redemption, of course. Can't forget the redemption. In Levity (written and directed by… read more!

The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou

The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou

I'm of the opinion that Wes Anderson's films represent a sort of cinematic law of diminishing returns: as each budget gets bigger, and as Anderson's cult following gets larger, his work becomes less interesting. To wit: Bottle Rocket was thoroughly original and charming; Rushmore was cute, if inconsequential; The Royal Tenenbaums was a bloated snooze. So it was with low… read more!

Life of Pi

Life of Pi

Gorgeous adaptation of Yann Martel's novel stars newcomer Suraj Sharma as Piscine "Pi" Patel, a young soul-searcher whose father runs a zoo in French-influenced Pondicherry until the late '70s, when it's decided that the Patel family, and their animals, must leave India for a better life in Canada. Nature has other plans, and after a devastating shipwreck in the Pacific,… read more!

The Life of Reilly

The Life of Reilly

Charles Nelson Reilly, who died earlier in 2007, is best known as a game show fixture throughout the '70s, most notably on Match Game, with his outrageous outfits and catty responses. The real Reilly, however, was a professionally trained, award-winning actor. Aware that his life was ebbing to its close, he put on a one-man show for a couple of… read more!

Lilo & Stitch

Lilo & Stitch

I avoided Disney animated movies for the past decade (with the notable exception of the Pixar films, which can't be considered "Disney" anyway) ever since being underwhelmed by the rather dull Beauty and the Beast. But after being assured that Lilo & Stitch eschewed the treacly song scores that have been the staple of Disney's recent cartoons (mushy junk by… read more!

Lilya 4-Ever

Lilya 4-Ever

If I hadn't already become a fan of young Swedish director Moodysson after seeing his first two features - the incredibly sympathetic and uplifting Show Me Love and Together - I wonder if I would have so readily believed that his brutal third film Lilya 4-Ever has a heart. The eponymous heroine (Oksana Akinshina) is a 16-year-old girl living in… read more!

The Limits of Control

The Limits of Control

I will not defend The Limits of Control to anybody. In fact, I predict that many will find the film insufferably pretentious and boring - and that includes fans of Jim Jarmusch. The director once claimed that he makes movies that are about the time that passes between moments, rather than about the moments themselves. This is especially true of… read more!