Movie Titles: M

Moonlight

Moonlight

Although 2016 kicked off with the underwhelming The Birth of a Nation poised as the "great black hope" of indie film, this gentle three-part drama about a closeted gay man – depicting him as a child, then as a teenager, and finally as an adult – came out of nowhere to blow everyone away, subverting all preconceptions about both black cinema and gay cinema in the… read more!

Moonrise Kingdom

Moonrise Kingdom

I soured on the nonstop whimsy of Wes Anderson's output shortly after The Royal Tenenbaums. But he won me back with his charming stop-motion comedy The Fantastic Mr. Fox, so I dared to take a chance on his latest, Moonrise Kingdom. The good news is that I think it's his best, most honest live action film since Bottle Rocket. The… read more!

Mother

Mother

Another wild ride from Bong Joon-ho, the talented writer/director best known for his monster movie The Host but also the helmer of the equally impressive detective thriller Memories of Murder. This is, to some extent, a return to the mystery genre for Bong, starring Kim Hye-ja in a go-for-broke performance as an older woman in a smallish Korean town whose… read more!

The Mother

The Mother

I was lucky to catch The Mother at a film festival in 2003 without knowing much about it ahead of time. Now that it's been released in the US, most reviews are already giving away plot twists that aren't revealed in the story until about halfway through the film, which is mean. So I'll leave the synopsis at this: A… read more!

Mother!

Mother!

Aronofsky's latest heavy-handed fever dream begins with a brief closeup of a burning woman's face. We then see the charred remains of an old house magically un-char before our very eyes as the camera floats through the hallway, ending on a bed, in which a figure magically appears under the sheets and rises. It is Jennifer Lawrence. She looks around… read more!

The Motorcycle Diaries

The Motorcycle Diaries

It took me all of four months to get around to seeing this film. Frankly, the notion of sitting through a biopic of the pre-revolutionary Ernesto "Che" Guevara as he wandered around South America didn't appeal to me, and that's not because I have anything against Communists. But it was a rainy day, and my girlfriend's a big fan of… read more!

Moulin Rouge!

Moulin Rouge!

Here it is, folks: the love-it or hate-it motion picture event of the year. I'll come right out and align myself with those who love it – although I was skeptical at first. Moulin Rouge! is a dizzying ride, a ridiculously melodramatic love triangle set against the infamous Parisian nightclub at the turn of the 20th Century. Penniless writer Christian… read more!

Mr. Holmes

Mr. Holmes

In the middle of Bill Condon's erratic career, which has veered from Dreamgirls to Kinsey to the last two Twilight movies to the Oscar bait misfire The Fifth Estate, the director reunites with Ian McKellen for a sort of bookend to his 1998 entry Gods and Monsters, the film that put both men on Hollywood's A-list. Like Gods and Monsters, Mr. Holmes is a low-budget… read more!

Mr. Lonely

Mr. Lonely

Harmony Korine was one of those names you couldn't avoid during the '90s, if you were following art house cinema or art snob culture. Debuting at barely 20 years old with his screenplay for Larry Clark's incendiary Kids, Korine followed that with his own auspicious directorial debut, the highly divisive Gummo (which I personally like very much). He had an… read more!

Mr. Turner

Mr. Turner

Just as writer/director Mike Leigh took a deliberately paced, extraordinarily detailed look at the lives of Gilbert and Sullivan in Topsy-Turvy back in 1999, so too does he here with the great 19th century English painter Joseph Mallord William Turner – "Billy" to his friends – played with aplomb by Leigh stalwart Timothy Spall. The key difference is that Topsy-Turvy's… read more!

Mulholland Drive

Mulholland Drive

I won't spend much time defending David Lynch. By this point, most folks have already decided whether they love his work or hate it. Me, I admire him for his artist's eye and his tireless imagination, though I don't always find an emotional connection to his increasingly opaque dream dramas. Such was the case with Lost Highway and such is… read more!

Munich

Munich

Good, not great, political thriller about a quintet of Jewish assassins (led by former Mossad agent Avner Kauffman, played by Australian actor Eric Bana) who have been assigned by the Israeli government to track down and kill the Palestinian men behind the kidnapping and murder of eleven Israeli athletes during the 1972 Olympics in Munich. Munich's tense set pieces alternate… read more!

Murderous Maids

Murderous Maids

1930s France was shocked by one of the most scandalous stories to hit in the pre-war years: two sisters, Christine and Lea Papin, working as chambermaids, suddenly turned on two of their employers and murdered them brutally – tearing out their eyeballs, slicing them up, and smearing the floor of the house with their blood. To add even more punch… read more!

Must Read After My Death

Must Read After My Death

In 2001, when filmmaker Morgan Dews's grandmother passed away, he discovered hours and hours of secret audio recordings that she and his grandfather had made during the 1960s, revealing startling facts about their relationship and the problems they were having with their four children, whom they had rather late in life. Dews decided to marry this audio to benign images… read more!

My Architect

My Architect

In 1974, renowned American architect Louis Kahn was found dead in Penn Station, bankrupt and alone, a heart attack victim at 73. At his funeral, it was discovered that along with his wife and daughter, he had sired two other children with two other women – and kept all three families going at the same time, while working himself to… read more!

My Best Fiend

My Best Fiend

Werner Herzog, the acclaimed director of several notorious German films during the '70s, takes a documentary look back at his love-hate relationship with the late actor Klaus Kinski, who starred in Herzog's best-known films, Aguirre, the Wrath of God, Fitzcarraldo, and Nosferatu. Through archival behind-the-scenes footage, as well as clips from the films themselves, Herzog (who re-dubs his own German… read more!

My Blueberry Nights

My Blueberry Nights

Legendary Hong Kong director Wong Kar Wai has been taking a drubbing by critics over this, his first English-language feature. I won't be so hard on My Blueberry Nights, though by no means did I find it a great film. Wallowing in Wong's trademark themes of loneliness and romantic obsession, the film is more or less divided into three stories, with itinerant waitress… read more!

My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea

My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea

If you like animated films, but you don't need to see any fluidity or "the illusion of life" in the animation itself, then I've got the movie for you. Cartoonist Dash Shaw's feature debut is nothing if not droll. The title is literal: the story concerns a high school built on an earthquake fault next to the sea. When an ill-advised auditorium… read more!

My Kid Could Paint That

My Kid Could Paint That

In 2004, the art world was abuzz with a new sensation: a four-year-old girl in upstate New York named Marla Olmstead, whose abstract paintings were so sophisticated that many felt that a prodigy had just been discovered. After her paintings began selling for five figures apiece, many others began doubting their authenticity, with Marla's sometime painter father Mark suspected of… read more!

My Summer of Love

My Summer of Love

Minor British slice of life drama, set in a dead-end Yorkshire town, where a romance blossoms between lonely local teenager Mona (Natalie Press) and a posh, flaky girl named Tamsin (Emily Blunt) who is in town for the summer. Add to the mix Mona's ex-con brother Phil (Paddy Considine from In America), who's just found Jesus. Not much of a… read more!